May 24, 2006

complete lack of compassion

Recently a group of at least 40 climbers attempting to reach the summit of Mt. Everest walked past a man dying of oxygen deficiency. Their goal of reaching the summit was evidently more important to them then making an effort to save the British mountaineer's life; he eventually died.

Luke (10:29-37) gives us the story of the good Samaritan who went out of his way to help a man left half dead by robbers. The priest and Levite ignored the dying man and callously walked past, yet a lowly Samaritan showed compassion and helped:
"But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was, and when he saw him, he had compassion. He went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he set him on his own animal and brought him to an inn and took care of him." Luke 10: 33,34 ESV
The guilty climbers in this article; Hillary rips climbers who left dying man, will forever be haunted by their lack of compassion for a fellow human being. Life is often of little importance to the self-centered who put their ambitions far above the well-being of their companions. It would be interesting to know how they would feel if it was their son, or father, who they left lying in the snow to die!

Before condemning these men to Satan's future habitation; don't we basically do the same thing every day these 40 mountaineers are guilty of; walking past men and women who are dying in sin without Jesus and never offering help, or a word of encouragement?






12 comments:

Gary Wood said...

Found your site by the next blog button on Blogger. Great post. Yes I know I must do better to point to Christ to those I come in contact. We can all be so callous.

Larry said...

Gary...
Thanks for commenting.

All of us are callous (I hope not knowingly) to a degree. We can usually sooth our conscience by walking as a group pass the one needing to meet Jesus. I'm definitely guilty.

dannykaye said...

Fantastic post, Larry.

I was all set to think the worst of the people who passed by that dying man.
AND THEN YA' GO AN' CONVICT ME!

ouch...

Larry said...

DannyKaye...
"ouch..." I'm sure most of us can ache and groan over our actions. :)

Like you, I was thinking the worst of these men after reading the article, then about half way through my post it dawned on me that I am often just as guilty.

Sometimes we not only walk past, but step across....not a real soothing thought!

jettybetty said...

I am really good at justifying who is and is not my neighbor--I suppose that makes me guilty.

Larry said...

JB...
How could someone as nice as you ever be guilty of anything? :)

Pastor Josh said...

Very well put. It show that sometimes we're no better than the common sinner.

Larry said...

PJ...
Appreciate your comments.

The fields are ready for harvest, yet we (especially me) often overlook those directly in our path as we seek larger and riper fields to harvest.

Checked out your site; good stuff!

Lee Hodges said...

Guilty, and working on it. Thanks brother for reminding us to be more conscious and aware.

timeless said...

Check out Thurman8er's link list and add "Um...this is my blog"
the two are going to have "Haiku Wars" soon...you shouldn't miss this...

Milly said...

I have to say this because I just do They should have administered care however they too most likely were suffering at that point and it plays on the mind. Your right we do walk past those in need at times. But the lack of oxygen must have played a large part in this.

Larry said...

Milly...
Thanks for the comments.

"lack of oxygen" That sounds good to me, but often people on their way to the top have a habit of stepping over, and on, those who impede their progress.

If the number of 40 climbers who walked past him is reported correctly, then there was a whole lot of oxygen deficiency at that moment.

Perhaps the truth will surface later providing a more humane reason for their actions.